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Marriage Act 1949

The Marriage Act 1949[1]

Parliament of the United Kingdom

Long title
An Act to consolidate certain enactments relating to the solemnization and registration of marriages in England with such corrections and improvements as may be authorised under the Consolidation of Enactments (Procedure) Act, 1949.

Citation
12, 13 & 14 Geo 6 c 76

Dates

Royal assent
24 November 1949

Commencement
1 January 1950[2]

Status: Amended

Text of statute as originally enacted

Revised text of statute as amended

The Marriage Act 1949 (12, 13 & 14 Geo 6 c 76) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom regulating marriages in England and Wales.
The Act had prohibited solemnizing marriages during evenings and at night. Since the Marriage Act 1836 it had been forbidden to marry between the hours of six in the evening and eight in the morning. This prohibition was repealed[3] on 1 October 2012.[4][5]
The Marriage Act 1949 was the first Act to be enacted under the Consolidation of Enactments (Procedure) Act 1949.[6]

This article may require cleanup to meet Wikipedia’s quality standards. The specific problem is: Please expand the summary of this Act so as to provide context for the sections that follow Please help improve this article if you can. (September 2015) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Contents

1 Section 2
2 Section 4
3 Section 75
4 Royal family
5 References
6 External links

Section 2[edit]
This section re-enacts the corresponding provision in section 1 of the Age of Marriage Act 1929.[7]
In 1971, Eekelaar wrote that the prohibition now contained in this section “though desirable, is extreme and inflexible.” According to him it could result in “genuine hardship”, such as where it is discovered, after years of apparent marriage, that a mistake was made, at the time of the ceremony, regarding the age of one of the spouses, or where one of the spouses concealed their real age, though, after 1971, some protection was afforded by section 6 of the Law Reform (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1970[8] (now repealed and replaced by the Inheritance (Provision for Family and Dependants) Act 1975).
Section 4[edit]
This section was repealed[9] on 1 October 2012.[10]
Section 75[edit]
Section 75(1)(a) was repealed[11] on 1 October 2012.[12]
Royal family[edit]
The wedding of Charles, Prince of Wales and Camilla Parker Bowles in 2005 brought into question whether civil marriages were available to members of the British royal fa
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Holger Hiemann

Holger Hiemann

Personal information

Date of birth
(1968-01-12) 12 January 1968 (age 49)

Place of birth
Karl-Marx-Stadt, East Germany

Height
1.87 m (6 ft 2 in)

Playing position
Goalkeeper

Club information

Current team

Chemnitzer FC (goalkeeper coach)

Senior career*

Years
Team
Apps
(Gls)

1986–1995
Chemnitzer FC
135
(0)

1995–1997
Hamburger SV
5
(0)

1997–2001
VfL Wolfsburg
6
(0)

2001–2004
Chemnitzer FC
64
(0)

Total

210
(0)

Teams managed

2010–
Chemnitzer FC (goalkeeper coach)

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

Holger Hiemann (born 12 January 1968 in Karl-Marx-Stadt) is a retired German football player. He spent four seasons in the Bundesliga with Hamburger SV and VfL Wolfsburg.[1]
References[edit]

^ “Hiemann, Holger” (in German). kicker.de. Retrieved 8 September 2011. 

External links[edit]

Holger Hiemann profile at Fussballdaten

This biographical article related to association football in Germany, about a goalkeeper, is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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George Maddox

George Maddox may refer to:

George Maddox (cricketer) (1811–1867), Australian cricketer
George Maddox (American football) (1911–1956), player in the National Football League
George Maddox (architect) (1760–1843), British architect and artist
George Vaughan Maddox (1802–1864), British architect and builder

This disambiguation page lists articles about people with the same name. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

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San Estanislao, Bolívar

San Estanislao, Bolívar

Municipality and town

Flag

Location of the municipality and town of San Estanislao, Bolívar in the Bolívar Department of Colombia

Country
 Colombia

Department
Bolívar Department

Time zone
Colombia Standard Time (UTC-5)

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (August 2008) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

San Estanislao de Kostka is a town and municipality located in the Bolívar Department, northern Colombia.
[1]
San Estanislao is also informally known as Arenal by the locals, Arenal is Spanish for “sand”, which earned its nickname in result that the town accumulates high amounts of sand during rain and wind. A mission was established on the present site in 1650. Access to the town can be challenging as the roads that access the town are unpaved and often water-logged after long periods of rain. Inhabitants of San Estanislao generally support themselves through family farms yielding a variety of produce and meat products, which are they often trade amongst themselves. The people of San Estanislao are known to be very humble and hard working.

Contents

1 Location
2 Population
3 Climate
4 References

Location[edit]
San Estanislao is located alongside the northeastern side of the Dique Canal 16 meters (55 feet) above sea level. Nearest major metropolitan municipalities are Barranquilla to the north by northeast, and Cartagena to the west. The town of Soplaviento is located across the canal from San Estanislao.
Population[edit]
30,000
Climate[edit]
The average temperature is approximately 35.0’C (95.0’F) during the day, 23.9’C (75.0’F) at night, and is generally the same most of the calendar year.

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Municipalities in the Bolivar Department

Achí
Altos del Rosario
Arenal del Sur
Arjona
Arroyo Hondo
Barranco de Loba
Calamar
Cantagallo
Carmen de Bolívar
Cartagena
Cicuco
Clemencia
Córdoba
El Guamo
Hatillo de Loba
Magangué
Mahates
Margarita
María La Baja
Santa Cruz de Mompox
Montecristo
Morales
Norosí
El Peñón
Pinillos
Regidor
Rio Viejo
San Cristóbal
San Estanislao
San Fernando
San Jacinto
San Jacinto del Cauca
San Juan Nepomuceno
San Martín de Loba
San Pablo
Santa Catalina
Santa Rosa
Simití
Soplaviento
Talaiga Nuevo
Tiquisio
Turbaco
Turbana
Villanueva
Zambrano
Santa Rosa del Sur

Coordinates:
일산오피

Autocorrelation

Above: A plot of a series of 100 random numbers concealing a sine function. Below: The sine function revealed in a correlogram produced by autocorrelation.

Visual comparison of convolution, cross-correlation and autocorrelation.

Autocorrelation, also known as serial correlation, is the correlation of a signal with itself at different points in time. Informally, it is the similarity between observations as a function of the time lag between them. The analysis of autocorrelation is a mathematical tool for finding repeating patterns, such as the presence of a periodic signal obscured by noise, or identifying the missing fundamental frequency in a signal implied by its harmonic frequencies. It is often used in signal processing for analyzing functions or series of values, such as time domain signals.
Unit root processes, trend stationary processes, autoregressive processes, and moving average processes are specific forms of processes with autocorrelation.

Contents

1 Definitions

1.1 Statistics
1.2 Signal processing

2 Properties
3 Efficient computation
4 Estimation
5 Regression analysis
6 Applications
7 Serial dependence
8 See also
9 References
10 Further reading
11 External links

Definitions[edit]
Different fields of study define autocorrelation differently, and not all of these definitions are equivalent. In some fields, the term is used interchangeably with autocovariance.
Statistics[edit]
In statistics, the autocorrelation of a random process is the correlation between values of the process at different times, as a function of the two times or of the time lag. Let X be a stochastic process, and t be any point in time. (t may be an integer for a discrete-time process or a real number for a continuous-time process.) Then Xt is the value (or realization) produced by a given run of the process at time t. Suppose that the process has mean μt and variance σt2 at time t, for each t. Then the definition of the autocorrelation between times s and t is

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X

BJ야동

Lemyra everetti

Lemyra everetti

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Animalia

Phylum:
Arthropoda

Class:
Insecta

Order:
Lepidoptera

Superfamily:
Noctuoidea

Family:
Erebidae

Subtribe:
Spilosomina

Genus:
Lemyra

Species:
L. everetti

Binomial name

Lemyra everetti
(Rothschild, 1910)

Synonyms

Diacrisia everetti Rothschild, 1910
Spilosoma everetti

Lemyra everetti is a moth of the family Erebidae. It is found on Flores.[1]
References[edit]

^ Lemyra at funet

This Spilosomina-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Quarry Bends

The A3 Castletown to Ramsey Road approaching Quarry Bends, near Sulby, Isle of Man.

Quarry Bends (Manx: Close e Volley – Enclosure of the Old Curragh Road)[1] is situated adjacent to the 19th Milestone road-side marker on the Snaefell Mountain Course on the primary A3 Castletown to Ramsey, in the parishes of Ballaugh and Lezayre in the Isle of Man. Quarry Bends is the site of the Curraghs Wildlife Park, the nearby Gob y Volley Forestry Plantation and Close e Volley Depot, Forestry Division, Isle of Man Department of Environment, Food and Agriculture and the former Ballavolley Quarry.
The enclosures at Close e Volley and Ballavolley are part of the wetlands of the Ballaugh Curragh (Norse: Mirescog – Mire of the Turbary)[2] of 1,000 acres (405 ha) in area.[3] The primary A3 road as part of The Long Round the journey from Castletown to Ramsey made by horse-drawn carriers and the A14 Sandygate Road form a boundary of the Curragh’s wetland along with the tertiary U7 Old Sulby Road, C29 Old Windmill Road and B9 Ballacrye Road. In 1879 the Manx Northern Railway built a narrow gauge railway from St.John’s to Ramsey which ran parallel to the A3 road from Kirk Michael to Sulby Bridge. The railway line crossed a number of minor roads as it passed through the Curraghs at Ballacrye, Ballavolley and Cooilbane. A small railway siding was built in 1882 to serve Clarke’s stone quarry at Ballavolley crossing the primary A3 road at Close e Volley, later renamed Quarry Bends, running to a small loading wharf and siding to the main Ramsey to St. John’s railway line.[4]

TT racers approaching Quarry Bends in 2003

The Curragh’s wetlands were traditionally an area for growing hay for grazing including attempts in the 1930s to grow New Zealand flax. The area was purchased in 1963 by the Isle of Man Forestry, Lands and Mines Board and the Curraghs Wildlife Park of 211 Acres (85 ha) at Quarry Bends was opened by the Lieutenant Governor of the Isle of Man, Sir Ronald Garvey on 23 July 1965.[5] The Curragh’s Wildlife Park is now part of the Isle of Man Department of Community, Culture & Leisure and the park includes from 1992 The Orchid Line, a multi-gauge miniature railway of 1,750 feet in length operated by the Manx Model Engineering Society.
The Quarry Bends complex of bends was part of the Highland Course and Four Inch Course used for the Tourist Trophy automobile car races held in the Isle of Man between 1906 and 1922.[6] Quarry Bends is now part of the Snaefel
중국야동

Quarry Bends

The A3 Castletown to Ramsey Road approaching Quarry Bends, near Sulby, Isle of Man.

Quarry Bends (Manx: Close e Volley – Enclosure of the Old Curragh Road)[1] is situated adjacent to the 19th Milestone road-side marker on the Snaefell Mountain Course on the primary A3 Castletown to Ramsey, in the parishes of Ballaugh and Lezayre in the Isle of Man. Quarry Bends is the site of the Curraghs Wildlife Park, the nearby Gob y Volley Forestry Plantation and Close e Volley Depot, Forestry Division, Isle of Man Department of Environment, Food and Agriculture and the former Ballavolley Quarry.
The enclosures at Close e Volley and Ballavolley are part of the wetlands of the Ballaugh Curragh (Norse: Mirescog – Mire of the Turbary)[2] of 1,000 acres (405 ha) in area.[3] The primary A3 road as part of The Long Round the journey from Castletown to Ramsey made by horse-drawn carriers and the A14 Sandygate Road form a boundary of the Curragh’s wetland along with the tertiary U7 Old Sulby Road, C29 Old Windmill Road and B9 Ballacrye Road. In 1879 the Manx Northern Railway built a narrow gauge railway from St.John’s to Ramsey which ran parallel to the A3 road from Kirk Michael to Sulby Bridge. The railway line crossed a number of minor roads as it passed through the Curraghs at Ballacrye, Ballavolley and Cooilbane. A small railway siding was built in 1882 to serve Clarke’s stone quarry at Ballavolley crossing the primary A3 road at Close e Volley, later renamed Quarry Bends, running to a small loading wharf and siding to the main Ramsey to St. John’s railway line.[4]

TT racers approaching Quarry Bends in 2003

The Curragh’s wetlands were traditionally an area for growing hay for grazing including attempts in the 1930s to grow New Zealand flax. The area was purchased in 1963 by the Isle of Man Forestry, Lands and Mines Board and the Curraghs Wildlife Park of 211 Acres (85 ha) at Quarry Bends was opened by the Lieutenant Governor of the Isle of Man, Sir Ronald Garvey on 23 July 1965.[5] The Curragh’s Wildlife Park is now part of the Isle of Man Department of Community, Culture & Leisure and the park includes from 1992 The Orchid Line, a multi-gauge miniature railway of 1,750 feet in length operated by the Manx Model Engineering Society.
The Quarry Bends complex of bends was part of the Highland Course and Four Inch Course used for the Tourist Trophy automobile car races held in the Isle of Man between 1906 and 1922.[6] Quarry Bends is now part of the Snaefel
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